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Environmental Working Group’s Seafood Calculator

You’ve probably been hearing lots of good things about seafood.  It’s healthier than red meat.  It’s sustainable.  It’s high in omega-3 fatty acids, which lower inflammation and triglyceride levels, boost effects of antidepressants, and reduce symptoms of ADHD in children, among other benefits.  So is this all true?

Not always.  Most of our seafood contains at least some mercury, the result of previously-unregulated heavy metals polluting our waterways.  Sadly, much of our seafood isn’t sustainable either.  However, there’s no denying the fact that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial, and that as long as you can avoid as much mercury as you can, you should be able to enjoy seafood.  So the Environmental Working Group (EWG) came up with a handy little program: the Seafood Calculator!  Located at the link below, it’s easy to use.  You enter your weight, age, sex, whether you’re pregnant or nursing, and whether you have a heart condition, and the calculator lets you know how many servings of each kind of seafood per week you can eat.

I tried it just now, and as a seafood lover, I was pleased with my results.  It turns out that some of my favorite seafood, like salmon, mussels, and rainbow trout, not only have relatively low mercury content, but are good sources of omega-3 fatty acids.  Shrimp, scallops, clams, catfish, and tilapia are low in mercury content but are also low in omega-3 fatty acid content.  The only fish I was told to avoid were shark, orange roughy, and swordfish.

Go to the link below to make your own seafood calculations:

Seafood Calculator